Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

1071 Fifth Avenue
The Guggenheim holds a unique place in the history of New York City's museums. Established some sixty years ago by philanthropist Solomon R. Guggenheim and artist-advisor Hilla Rebay, it first assumed temporary residence in a former automobile showro... more
The Guggenheim holds a unique place in the history of New York City's museums. Established some sixty years ago by philanthropist Solomon R. Guggenheim and artist-advisor Hilla Rebay, it first assumed temporary residence in a former automobile showroom on East 54th Street in New York. The "Museum of Non-Objective Painting," as it was then known, took as its basis the radical new forms of art being developed by such artists as Vasily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, and Piet Mondrian. The insistence of its founders on a wholly new kind of art seen in a wholly new kind of space set the Guggenheim on its path. Throughout its history, it has stood as a groundbreaking institution geared as much toward the promise of the future as the preservation of the past. The belief in preservation was furthered by a recent extensive restoration of the museum’s exterior, which as of 2008 is now nearly complete. The innovative cylindrical building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, has suffered cracks in its concrete surface since the museum opened in 1959. In 2005, twelve layers of paint were removed in order to repair and restore the building’s unique structure. The museum remained open throughout the proces... more
The Guggenheim holds a unique place in the history of New York City's museums. Established some sixty years ago by philanthropist Solomon R. Guggenheim and artist-advisor Hilla Rebay, it first assumed temporary residence in a former automobile showroom on East 54th Street in New York. The "Museum of Non-Objective Painting," as it was then known, took as its basis the radical new forms of art being developed by such artists as Vasily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, and Piet Mondrian. The insistence of its founders on a wholly new kind of art seen in a wholly new kind of space set the Guggenheim on its path.

Throughout its history, it has stood as a groundbreaking institution geared as much toward the promise of the future as the preservation of the past. The belief in preservation was furthered by a recent extensive restoration of the museum’s exterior, which as of 2008 is now nearly complete. The innovative cylindrical building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, has suffered cracks in its concrete surface since the museum opened in 1959. In 2005, twelve layers of paint were removed in order to repair and restore the building’s unique structure. The museum remained open throughout the process as visitors passed under scaffolding to enter the building.

The first permanent home for the museum, as mentioned, was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. He envisioned a building that not only broke the rectilinear grid of Manhattan but also shattered existing notions of what a museum could be. He conceived of its curving, continuous space as a "temple of spirit" where viewers could foster a new way of looking. Named the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in honor of its founder, the building opened in 1959, drawing huge crowds and stirring considerable controversy. It has never lost its power to excite and provoke, standing today as one of the great works of architecture produced in the twentieth century.

The museum entered a new era after the naming of Richard Armstrong as director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation in late 2008. As director, Mr. Armstrong has a pivotal role in overseeing all aspects of the museums including acquisitions, development, conservation and scholarship.

While the Guggenheim Museum in New York is the Foundation’s flagship museum, there are also several other global branches of the Guggenheim network which include The Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao in Spain and The Deutsche Guggenheim in Berlin. The Guggenheim Abu Dhabi Museum is scheduled to open in 2025.

Drag the street view to look around 360°.
Use the arrow buttons to navigate down the street and around the neighborhood!

There are no events taking place on this date.

Info

1071 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10128
(212) 423-3500
Website

Editorial Rating

Admission And Tickets

$25 - Adults
$18 - Seniors, Students
Children under 12: Free
Members: Free

Pay what you wish Saturdays 6pm - 8pm

This Week's Hours

Monday 11am – 6pm
Tuesday Closed
Wednesday 11am – 6pm
Thursday 11am – 6pm
Friday 11am – 6pm
Saturday 11am – 8pm
Sunday 11am – 6pm

Members-only hours on select Mondays 6-8 pm

Closed November 25 (Thanksgiving Day) and December 25 (Christmas)

Nearby Subway

  • to 86th St

Upcoming Events

Works & Process: Vineyard Theatre, Second Stage Theater

Ahead of its world premiere, go behind the scenes of this epic and viciously funny new musical by Michael R. Jackson, the Tony Award– and Pulitzer Prize–winning creator of A Strange Loop. In White Girl in Danger—a fever dream mashup of classic daytime and primetime soap operas, Lifetime movies, and ... [ + ]red-hot melodrama—the citizens of the soap opera town Allwhite face high-stakes drama and intrigue all the days of their lives. Meanwhile Keesha Gibbs and the other Blackgrounds have been relegated to backburner stories of slavery and police violence for all of theirs. But Keesha is determined to step out of the Blackground and into the center of Allwhite’s juiciest stories. Can Keesha handle the Allwhite attention—especially from the Allwhite Killer on the loose? What role do the other Blackgrounds play in Keesha’s Allwhite schemes? And just whose story is this anyway? Find out as Jackson, choreographer Raja Feather Kelly, and director Lileana Blain-Cruz discuss the show and their creative process. Cast members perform highlights before the start of previews on March 14.

For tickets and more information, please visit https://www.guggenheim.org/event/works-process-vineyard-theatre-second-stage-theater-white-girl-in-danger-by-michael-r-jackson.


About Works & Process
Championing the creative process from studio-to-stage, Works & Process, is an independent performing arts organization that supports artists from both the world's largest organizations and from underrecognized performing arts cultures by providing rare, sequenced and fully-funded creative residency, commissioning, and iterative presenting support. Blending artist discussions and performance highlights, each program provides unprecedented behind the scenes access to support our goal of broadening representation and fostering greater understanding and appreciation of the performing arts. Works & Process celebrates New York artists and street and social dance with programs at the Guggenheim Museum, Lincoln Center, and The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, with the Jerome Robbins Dance Division. LaunchPAD "Process as Destination" partnerships with 12 residency centers across New York State amplify our support for artistic process.

"But praise and gratitude also must go to Works & Process and Jacob's Pillow. These organizations have not only been providing lifelines to artists during the pandemic, they have also been directing attention and resources to dance communities often neglected by the institutions of concert dance."

—The New York Times

Stay connected, @worksandprocess

02/26/2023 07:30 PM
Sun, February 26
7:30PM
$
$25 - Adults
$18 - Seniors, Students
Children under 12: Free
Members: Free

Pay what you wish Saturdays 6pm - 8pm
Get Tickets

Works & Process at the Guggenheim presents Birthday Presence

Works & Process at the Guggenheim presents Birthday Presence by Jasmine Rice LaBeija, featuring performance highlights and moderated discussion about the forthcoming premiere of Birthday Presence. Tickets available now at www.worksandprocess.org.

Birthday Presence by Jasmine Rice LaBeija
Wednesd... [ + ]ay, March 8, 7:30 pm
Tickets $35-$45, Choose What You Pay

The International Godmother of the Royal House of LaBeija—recently shouted out by Beyoncé in "Break My Soul (Queens Remix)"—summons her family uptown for a birthday kiki destined for legendary status. Drag artist Jasmine Rice LaBeija is a Juilliard-trained tenor possessed of a devastating wit, razor-sharp timing, and a commanding voice; all of which will be on full display in her new cabaret extravaganza premiering March 8 at Works & Process at the Guggenheim on the day of her father's birth. Then on May 17, crossing town to Works & Process at Lincoln Center, the downtown darling hosts a homecoming celebration recital on the blessed day of her own birth, christening the newly opened David Geffen Hall's sidewalk studio with unparalleled fabulousness. Your presence is expressly requested.

WORKS & PROCESS AT THE GUGGENHEIM
1071 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

ABOUT WORKS & PROCESS
An independent process-focused non-profit performing arts organization, Works & Process champions creative process from studio-to-stage and illuminates the artistic process of creators from the world's largest organizations and simultaneously champions artists representing historically underrecognized performing arts cultures by providing rare longitudinal and fully funded creative residency, commissioning, and presenting support.

Works & Process provides audiences with unprecedented access to creative process with programs that blend artist discussions and performance highlights, with the goal of fostering greater understanding and appreciation and broadening representation.

This season Works & Process celebrates New York artists, street and social dance, and after four decades at the Guggenheim expands beyond the museum to also present at Lincoln Center and The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, with the Jerome Robbins Dance Division. Our ongoing LaunchPAD "Process as Destination" residency program knits together a constellation of 12 residency centers across New York state to support creative process.

"But praise and gratitude also must go to Works & Process and Jacob's Pillow. These organizations have not only been providing lifelines to artists during the pandemic, they have also been directing attention and resources to dance communities often neglected by the institutions of concert dance."
– The New York Times

03/08/2023 07:30 PM
Wed, March 08
7:30PM
$
$25 - Adults
$18 - Seniors, Students
Children under 12: Free
Members: Free

Pay what you wish Saturdays 6pm - 8pm
Get Tickets
View All Upcoming Events

@guggenheim

Happy birthday to the founder of our museum, Solomon R. Guggenheim! He was born on this day in 1861. 🎉 Learn more about Guggenheim:
https://t.co/7j7YbB89br 📷: Guggenheim with Rudolf Bauer’s White Fugue, 1923–27
https://t.co/Pbfu9RDa2J Yesterday at 2:53 PM

Lorna Simpson's black-and-white photographs investigate the relationship between image and text. A nuanced exploration of identity also serves as the foundation of Simpson’s work. Learn more:
https://t.co/o53EBBDt24 📷: Lorna Simpson, "Flipside," 1991. © Lorna Simpson
https://t.co/E2HYLLqTdY Yesterday at 9:10 PM

Ruth Asawa was a Japanese-American sculptor born in California in 1926. At 15, she was forced to relocate to an internment camp. Despite this, she learned from professional artists believing that art can be a positive force for social good. Pictured:
https://t.co/wKnekEyMJ0
https://t.co/6UavM1P5bt Tue at 8:35 PM

@KJRinCT We ♥️ you, too! Tue at 3:43 PM

view all

Other Museums Attractions

National Museum of the American Indian

The National Museum of the American Indian is the sixteenth museum of the Smiths... view

Children's Museum of the Arts

Founded in October 1988 by Kathleen Schneider, the Children's Museum of the Arts... view

P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center

Entry to the Museum is by advance timed ticket only and capacity is limited. Tic... view

Bartow-Pell Mansion

The Bartow-Pell Mansion Museum is an elegant mid-17th century mansion with manic... view